Saturday, March 7, 2015

Our Last Big Snowfall This Winter?

Another ten inches Thursday, on after a few hours of rain. I've never had a car totally iced over so that I could not open the doors -- until yesterday morning. The sun came out bright and happy. I swept off the fluffy snow. By 11:30 the sun did it's work, I could get into my car. 

Meanwhile the geese, like our summer beach visitors, seem to enjoy settling on the snow and sunbathing. I saw one guy with a baggie of bread pieces feeding them. 

This picture shows how the snow drifts up to the building, actually higher than the windows. And the narrow shoveled walkway is a ditch in the snow. In the afternoon my daughter came over with two shovels. We set about clearing what is really three parking spaces in the area of the lot I like to park in. We rememberted this kind of work in the long ago past when she was in high school and we lived in the snow belt of upstate New York. She reminded me that one of my first publications in a regional (not really national) magazines was a tongue-in-cheek article about snow shoveling in Yankee Magazine. And I reminded her that fifteen years before that I had published my first article in a national magazine called Baby Talk, which is still a freebie; in that long ago era long before Pampers, the magazine came with diaper services. But I digress. 

Maybe this is our last snow of the year here in New England. Records have been broken! But I have seen big snowfalls in April so... we'll wait and see.

2 comments:

barbara judge said...

The ducks sitting in the snow on the snow banks is something I have never seen before. But I guess they love cold water so a snow bank is about the same. I think it is the sun that drew them to that spot. Nice poet -- barbara

June Calender said...

It must be the sun's warmth from the snow that makes they sit and rest there. The ambient air has been below freezing but snow on cars melts and the inside of the car can become cozy warm.They remind me of people at fancy ski resorts who sun bath in the snow (but they ARE warmly dressed)